Framing the Victorians
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 255

Framing the Victorians

A wide-ranging exploration of the complex and often conflicting discourse on photography in the nineteenth century, Framing the Victorians traces various descriptions of photography as art, science, magic, testimony, proof, document, record, illusion, and diagnosis. Victorian photography, argues Jennifer Green-Lewis, inspired such universal fascination that even two so self-consciously opposed schools as positivist realism and metaphysical romance claimed it as their own. Photography thus became at once the symbol of the inadequacy of nineteenth-century empiricism and the proof of its totalizing vision. Green-Lewis juxtaposes textual descriptions with pictorial representations of a diverse a...

Victorian Photography, Literature, and the Invention of Modern Memory
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 200

Victorian Photography, Literature, and the Invention of Modern Memory

Invented during a period of anxiety about the ability of human memory to cope with the demands of expanding knowledge, photography not only changed the way the Victorians saw the world, but also provided them with a new sense of connection with the past and a developing language with which to describe it. Analysing a broad range of texts by inventors, cultural critics, photographers, and novelists, Victorian Photography, Literature, and the Invention of Modern Memory: Already the Past argues that Victorian photography ultimately defined the concept of memory for generations to come –including our own. In addition to being invaluable for scholars working within the emerging field of research at the intersection of photographic and literary studies, this book will also be of interest to students of Victorian and modernist literature, visual culture and intellectual history.

Teaching Beauty in DeLillo, Woolf, and Merrill
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 200

Teaching Beauty in DeLillo, Woolf, and Merrill

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 2008-04-14
  • -
  • Publisher: Springer

This book marks the growing exhaustion with a politicized approach to literature, and celebrate the return of beauty as a subject in its own right to literary studies.

The Intimate Archive
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 198

The Intimate Archive

The Intimate Archive examines the issues involved in using archival material to research the personal lives of public people, in this case of Australian writers Marjorie Barnard (1897-1987), Aileen Palmer (1915-1988) and Lesbia Harford (1891-1927). The book provides an insight into the romantic experiences of the three women, based on their private letters, diaries and notebooks held in public institutions. Maryanne Dever, Ann Vickery and Sally Newman consider the ethical dilemmas that they faced while researching private material, in particular of making conclusions based on material that was possibly never intended by its subjects to be consumed publically. In this sense, the book is both an introverted contemplation of private affairs and an extroverted meditation on the right to acquire and assume intimate knowledge.

A Royal Passion
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 232

A Royal Passion

In January 1839, photography was announced to the world. Two years prior, a young Queen Victoria ascended to the throne of Great Britain and Ireland. These two events, while seemingly unrelated, marked the beginnings of a relationship that continued throughout the nineteenth century and helped construct the image of an entire age. A Royal Passion explores the connections between photography and the monarchy through Victoria’s embrace of the new medium and her portrayal through the lens. Together with Prince Albert, her beloved husband, the Queen amassed one of the earliest collections of photographs, including works by renowned photographers such as Roger Fenton, Gustave Le Gray, and Julia...

Royal Representations
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 322

Royal Representations

Queen Victoria was one of the most complex cultural productions of her age. In Royal Representations, Margaret Homans investigates the meanings Victoria held for her times, Victoria's own contributions to Victorian writing and art, and the cultural mechanisms through which her influence was felt. Arguing that being, seeming, and appearing were crucial to Victoria's "rule," Homans explores the variability of Victoria's agency and of its representations using a wide array of literary, historical, and visual sources. Along the way she shows how Victoria provided a deeply equivocal model for women's powers in and out of marriage, how Victoria's dramatic public withdrawal after Albert's death helped to ease the monarchy's transition to an entirely symbolic role, and how Victoria's literary self-representations influenced debates over political self-representation. Homans considers versions of Victoria in the work of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, George Eliot, John Ruskin, Margaret Oliphant, Lewis Carroll, Alfred Lord Tennyson, and Julia Margaret Cameron.

Charlotte M. Yonge
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 328

Charlotte M. Yonge

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 2007
  • -
  • Publisher: Peter Lang

Charlotte M Yonge was one of the bestselling novelists of the Victorian period; she published prolifically during a lengthy writing career that lasted from the early 1850s to the 1890s, was highly regarded by contemporaries such as Tennyson and Kingsley, and continued to be widely read up till the 1940s even by unlikely figures such as Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West. Her work, on which Jane Austen exerted a significant influence, is central to an understanding of the development of the domestic novel, yet remains significantly less well known than that of other Victorian women writers such as Margaret Oliphant, Ellen Wood and M E Braddon. This book is the first full-length critical study of Yonge's writings, and presents an argument for the artistic coherence of her work as a novelist, as well as examining the reasons for its current non-canonical status. Reflecting Yonge's lifelong involvement in the Oxford Movement, and personal closeness to John Keble, the book situates her novels in the context of Tractarian aesthetics.

Victorian Afterlife
  • Language: en

Victorian Afterlife

None

Media, Technology, and Literature in the Nineteenth Century
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 316

Media, Technology, and Literature in the Nineteenth Century

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 2016-04-29
  • -
  • Publisher: Routledge

Operating at the intersection where new technology meets literature, this collection discovers the relationship among image, sound, and touch in the long nineteenth century. The chapters speak to the special mixed-media properties of literature, while exploring the important interconnections of science, technology, and art at the historical moment when media was being theorized, debated, and scrutinized. Each chapter focuses on a specific visual, acoustic, or haptic dimension of media, while also calling attention to the relationships among the three. Famous works such as Wordsworth's "I wandered lonely as a cloud" and Shelley's Frankenstein are discussed alongside a range of lesser-known li...

Victorian Photography and Literary Nostalgia
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 244

Victorian Photography and Literary Nostalgia

This book traces the various ways in which Victorian writers, photographers, publishers, and consumers translated the idea of photography into an ideal of arrested time. The possibility of arresting time was the symbolic currency of all those in the business of selling poetry to a wider audience through popular forms such as the gift books, travel guides, magic lantern shows, working men's editions of verse, celebrity portraits, memorabilia, and mementos. Beginning with an analysis of early photographic reviewing cultures and the first photographically illustrated verse anthologies to be published in England, Helen Groth then traces the cultural permutations of literary and cultural nostalgia that the work of poets such as Wordsworth, Scott, Barrett Browning, Tennyson, and lesser-known poets such as Augusta Webster and Agnes Mary Frances Robinson inspired in Victorian photographers, publishers, and critics alike.