Rogue Archives
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 440

Rogue Archives

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2016-09-23
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  • Publisher: MIT Press

An examination of how nonprofessional archivists, especially media fans, practice cultural preservation on the Internet and how "digital cultural memory" differs radically from print-era archiving.

Science in the Archives
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 392

Science in the Archives

Archives bring to mind rooms filled with old papers and dusty artifacts. But for scientists, the detritus of the past can be a treasure trove of material vital to present and future research: fossils collected by geologists; data banks assembled by geneticists; weather diaries trawled by climate scientists; libraries visited by historians. These are the vital collections, assembled and maintained over decades, centuries, and even millennia, which define the sciences of the archives. With Science in the Archives, Lorraine Daston and her co-authors offer the first study of the important role that these archives play in the natural and human sciences. Reaching across disciplines and centuries, ...

The Chinese Banking Industry
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 216

The Chinese Banking Industry

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2007-08-18
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  • Publisher: Routledge

This book provides detailed systematic micro-level analysis of the historical development of the Chinese banking industry, focusing in particular on the development of the Bank of China (BOC) in the period 1905 to 1949. Banking reform is a key area of China’s economic transformation, and this book, bringing a vast amount of material to a Western audience for the first time, provides a detailed evidence of the key challenges faced by a major Chinese bank. The book: addresses important issues in its evolution, including corporate governance government intervention, foreign competition and white-collar crime evaluates how the challenges in these areas were met considers the results of its efforts draws lessons for policy making today.

Archives of Flesh
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 264

Archives of Flesh

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2016-12-13
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  • Publisher: NYU Press

In Archives of Flesh, Robert Reid-Pharr reveals the deep history of intellectual engagement between African America and Spain. Opening a fascinating window onto black and anti-Fascist intellectual life from 1898 through the mid-1950s, Reid-Pharr argues that key institutions of Western Humanism, including American colleges and universities, developed in intimate relation to slavery, colonization, and white supremacy. This retreat to rigidly established philosophical and critical traditions can never fully address—or even fully recognize—the deep-seated hostility to black subjectivity underlying the humanist ideal of a transcendent Manhood. Calling for a specifically anti-white supremacist...

Guide to the Boris I. Nicolaevsky Collection in the Hoover Institution Archives
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 755

Guide to the Boris I. Nicolaevsky Collection in the Hoover Institution Archives

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A History of Cambridge University Press: Volume 2, Scholarship and Commerce, 1698-1872
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 535

A History of Cambridge University Press: Volume 2, Scholarship and Commerce, 1698-1872

The second volume of the history of Cambridge University Press covering the 1690s to 1872.

History of Oxford University Press: Volume I
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 710

History of Oxford University Press: Volume I

The story of Oxford University Press spans five centuries of printing and publishing, leading from the early days of printing to worldwide publishing in academic research, education, and English language learning. How Oxford gained its Press Volume I begins with the successive attempts to establish printing at Oxford from 1478 onwards. Expert contributors chart the activities of individual printers, the eventualestablishment of a university printing house, its relationship with the University, and developments in printing under Archbishop Laud, John Fell, and William Blackstone. They explore the Press's scholarly publications and place in the book trade, and its growing influence on the city of Oxford.

The Archive Thief
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 336

The Archive Thief

In the aftermath of the Holocaust, Jewish historian Zosa Szajkowski gathered up tens of thousands of documents from Nazi buildings in Berlin, and later, public archives and private synagogues in France, and moved them all, illicitly, to New York. In The Archive Thief, Lisa Moses Leff reconstructs Szajkowski's story in all its ambiguity. Born into poverty in Russian Poland, Szajkowski first made his name in Paris as a communist journalist. In the late 1930s, as he saw the threats to Jewish safety rising in Europe, he broke with the party and committed himself to defending his people in a new way, as a scholar associated with the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. Following a harrowing 1941 e...

Reappraising Republican China
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 209

Reappraising Republican China

'Well-researched... of great value to research scholars.' -The Journal of the United Service Institution of IndiaThis book is a testament to the accomplishments of Republican studies during the 1980s and early 1990s. Leading scholars review many aspects of contemporary research on the Republican era, ranging from the influence of fascism on Chiang Kai-Shek to the transition from the Qing dynasty to the Republic. Relevant for all interested in the key period in China between Monarchy and Communism.

Don Quixote in the Archives: Madness and Literature in Early Modern Spain
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 232

Don Quixote in the Archives: Madness and Literature in Early Modern Spain

A new reading of madness in Don Quixote based on archival accounts of insanityFrom the records of the Spanish Inquisition, Dale Shuger presents a social corpus of early modern madness that differs radically from the 'literary' madness previously studied. Drawing on over 100 accounts of insanity defences, many of which contain statements from a wide social spectrum - housekeepers, nieces, doctors, and barbers - as well as the testimonies of the alleged madmen and women themselves, Shuger argues that Cervantes' exploration of madness as experience is intimately linked to the questions about ethics, reason, will and selfhood that unreason presented for early modern Spaniards. In adapting, challenging and transforming these discourses, Don Quixote investigates spaces of interiority, confronts the limitations of knowledge - of the self and the world - and reflects on the social strategies for diagnosing and dealing with those we cannot understand. Shuger discovers an intimate connection between Cervantes's integration of this discourse of madness and his part in forging the new genre of the European novel.